Whale Killing - 16 photos






Torshavn , Faroe Islands, 2011
Every year, herds of pilot whales (Latin Globicephala Melaena) are passing by the shores of Faroe Islands during their migrations. When a herd of pilot whales has been spotted close to the shore, fishermen are alarming other inhabitants of islands as well as the head of the police department for that are, so very soon a massive ship convoy is surrounding the whale herd and they are trying to push them into the closest and authorized fjord (bay) for slaughtering.
photo Andrija Ilic
Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Inhabitants of Faroe Islands during the "Grindadráp",Faroese term for whale killing. Grindadráp does not happen on certain dates, but occasionally, several times a year. Depends on if the whales are spotted and if the whalers manage to push the herd into the bay.
photo Andrija Ilic



Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Man is hooking up the whale and pulling him to the sand beach where the whale is going to be killed. The whole process of killing whales in Faroe Islands is regulated by law, and it is supervised by authorities as well as by animal protection groups.
photo Andrija Ilic



     
Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Now a days killing methods are improved. Whaling foreman (on the photo) is the only authorized person allowed and trained to give the whale a quick and "human" death. Whales are killed with a spinal lance which is used to sever the spinal cord, simultaneously severing the major blood supply to the brain, meaning a loss of both consciousness and death within seconds.
photo Andrija Ilic
Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Faroes men pulling the whales to the shore. Grindadráp is very well organized event, where all the participants are disciplined and they know their place and their duties during the whale killing.
photo Andrija Ilic


Torshavn , Faroe Islands, 2011
Crowd of Faroese men focused on Grindadráp.
The Faroese are direct descendents of Vikings, and more than 1000 years, whale hunting was the esence of survival in these islands where because of the harsh climate, nothing grows on land.
photo Andrija Ilic


     
Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
After the whales are killed, whalers have to empty the bodies of blood.
photo Andrija Ilic



Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Equipment for killing whales has evolved as well. Spears and harpoons for killing are forbidden by law, as well as stubbing whales in the ocean. Instead of sharp hooks for pulling whales out, now a days are in use blunt hooks (on photo) with a ball on the end.
photo Andrija Ilic
Streymoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Whalers are emptying the blood of killed whales.
photo Andrija Ilic




     
Sandoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2012
Whaling foreman is killing a pilot whale.
photo Andrija Ilic


Streymoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2009
Whalers pulling out whales to the shore.
photo Andrija Ilic


Streymoy Island , Faroe Islands, 2009
Participants of whale killing are adult men, sometimes women help, while kids are passive observers from the shore of the bay.
photo Andrija Ilic
     
Torshavn, Faroe Islands, 2010
All killed whales are marked and registered, and the number of killed whales are controlled and veryfied by whalers, authorities and animal protection groups. Pilot whales are not endangered species. It is estimated that around 750.000 pilot whales are migrating in the North Atlantic Ocean, and Faroese whalers are killing less per year then they are allowed, which is 2% percent of the population.
photo Andrija Ilic
Torshavn, Faroe Islands, 2010
Bodies of dead whales in the harbor of Torshavn.
Faroese whalers are not involved in commercial whaling. They dont export the meat, neither the meat can be bought for money in the shop. All the whale meat is equally divided and distributed among the inhabitants of the municipality where the whale killing took place.
photo Andrija Ilic

Torshavn, Faroe Islands, 2010
A Faroese man shows his son how to remove teeth from whale's jaw. Whale meat and blubber are Faroese delicacies. When fresh, the meat is boiled or served as steaks. The traditional preservation is by salting or outdoor wind-drying.
photo Andrija Ilic







 

 

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